Pasture and Manure Management Webinars

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MHU Lunch Chat: Getting the Most of Your Horse Pasture

April 2020

    

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MHU Lunch Chat: Managing Your Horse Farm Manure

April 2020

    

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Considering Land Issues Related to Small Property Horse Keeping

October 2019

Using examples from several communities around the country that allow horses to be kept on small acreage and residential properties, you’ll learn how your community’s zoning practices, prevalence of existing horse-related activities, land characteristics, building codes, tax structure, state regulations and other factors enter into the decision to keep horses at your residence.

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Manure Mangement Strategies - Help Your Horse, Help Your Farm, AND Protect Our Water

December 2014

Did you know that each horse makes about 50 pounds of manure EVERY DAY? Nutrients in manure and urine can get into ground- and surface waters, potentially making them undrinkable. Both nationally and internationally, water quality is becoming a very serious issue. The good news is that properly managing manure and pastures is neither difficult nor impossibly expensive.

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Pasture Rotation

May 2012

Want more productivity from your pasture(s)? Join this webcast to learn more about the considerations in regard to rotational grazing.

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Tractor and Machinery Safety

April 2012

Tractors and machinery are a leading cause of injuries in agriculture. Hazard recognition and abatement strategies can be simple and inexpensive once you know where to look for the hazards. These same strategies can also be used when purchasing new or used agricultural equipment.

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How Green is Your Farm

December 2010

Implementing green practices on your horse farm is not only something you should do, but in some cases, are required to do. Fortunately, incorporating more environmentally friendly management methods can be simple and inexpensive. This webcast will discuss environmental regulations and how to comply with them, including strategies for natural pest control, manure management, mud reduction and maintaining a healthy pasture.

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Horse Manure: A Renewable Resource

March 2009

Manure, if used properly, can be a valuable addition to any operation's resource system. Many small scale horse operators feel overwhelmed by the huge mound of manure and soiled bedding. It would be nice if that mound would just disappear, but the reality is that it will always be a concern. So how do you manage the never-ending supply of manure? This is where a good manure management program comes into play; benefiting you, your livestock, your land, the neighborhood, and the surrounding environment.

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Pasture Management for Horse Acreages

February 2009

Most horse owners house their horses on acreage with the objective for the area to supply part or all of the nutritional needs. This webcast will cover some of the principles behind the decisions that must be made to maximize nutritional benefits of pasture forages. Topics will include grazing management, forage selection and production, and pasture forage management.

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Introduction to Environmentally Friendly Horse Management

January 2009

Are you interested in going green and finding ways to help the environment while using best management practices that can save time and money? Then consider joining us for this webcast, in which we will discuss an overview of different aspects to consider in being environmentally friendly such as manure management, runoff management, facilities management, stream and watercourse management, pasture management and more!

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Poisonous Plants

September 2008

This webcast will cover the key to preventing problems with poisonous plants and proper identification and avoidance of these plants. Examine pastures, hay fields, roadsides and fence rows for poisonous plants. In a drought year, or a year when feed is short, take extra precautions, and look for these plants in new areas planned for grazing or haying.